Good Questions to Bring to Your Audiology Appointment

We welcome your questions and want to make you feel comfortable when you visit us for your appointment. When you make an appointment, start thinking about the questions you have. Not sure what to ask? The following are some good questions to bring to your audiology appointment.

  1. What could be causing my hearing loss?
  2. What type of hearing loss do I have?
  3. Is there anything I can do to prevent further hearing loss?
  4. Is there hearing loss in both of my ears and is it the same type of hearing loss?
  5. Can hearing aids help me hear better?
  6. If I need hearing aids, what different types and styles will work for me?
  7. How much do hearing aids cost and what does my insurance cover?
  8. What type of maintenance and upkeep are needed for my hearing aids?
  9. Can I connect other devices to my hearing aids to help me hear better?
  10. What do I do if my hearing aids break or need repairs?
  11. How often should I come back for checkups?
  12. Can family and friends help me cope with and adjust to hearing loss or hearing aids?

Consult with the Experts at Smithtown / Sayville Hearing Services


If you want to learn more, or have questions before your appointment, just let us know. We’d love to see you and answer anything you’ve got for us. Getting your hearing on track is our goal. Here at Smithtown Hearing Services we are committed to better hearing and committed to you! Contact us today to schedule a FREE assessment.

Posted by Admin

4 Things You Should Know About Earwax

Earwax is not something we talk about in polite company, right? But it’s something everyone deals with, and it can give you insight into your general well-being, as well as alert you to ailments.

Here are four things we want you to know about earwax:

Earwax actually has a purpose.

Much like other bodily secretions, there is a reason our ears produce cerumen (that’s the technical term for earwax).

“Earwax is a natural barrier which prevents dirt and bacteria from entering the innermost parts of your ears. Because it is sticky, it collects microscopic debris which finds its way into your ear canal, much like flypaper traps insects. Without this defensive barrier, your inner ear would be at risk.”  (https://www.healthyhearing.com/report/52679-What-you-need-to-know-about-earwax)

The color, scent  and texture indicate a few things.

There are two varieties of earwax, “wet” and “dry”. Generally speaking, dry earwax is limited to people of Asian descent and the elderly. If you have always had wet earwax, but it’s suddenly dry and flaky, it’s probably because you are getting older. But you should still schedule an assessment with a hearing care professional to be sure.

When it comes to color, it’s not quite as telling as snot – but if it’s green, or yellowish and watery, you might have an infection. You should definitely schedule an appointment.

If the earwax your ears secrete has a distinct, unpleasant smell, please schedule an assessment sooner, rather than later.  It’s a sign of a serious infection called “Chronic Otitis Media”, and it can cause other problems with your balance and hearing.

There ARE times when earwax should be removed – but cleaning your ears regularly is unnecessary.

That’s because earwax is actually doing the job of cleaning your ears.

“The cells inside the ear canal are unique in the human body – they migrate. “You could put an ink dot on the eardrum and watch it move over a few weeks and it would be ‘carried out’ by the movement of the cells.” according to Prof Shakeel Saeed at London’s Royal National Throat, Nose and Ear hospital.

If this didn’t happen the mini cul-de-sac of the ear canal would soon fill up with dead cells created by the natural process of skin shedding.

This movement also propels the wax – produced by the modified sweat glands which line the ear canal – towards the outside. It’s thought that normal movements of the jaw – through eating and talking – assist with this movement.” (http://www.bbc.com/news/health-26527266)

But, as we said, there are times when earwax DOES need to be removed. You can try a DIY kit from a pharmacy, but if that doesn’t work, you can schedule an appointment with your hearing care professional to remove it for you.

During the winter, earwax can sometimes harden, causing a condition that forces the ear to grow an extra bone in an attempt to protect itself from the cold weather.

“This new bone growth constricts the ear canal, creating challenges for earwax to naturally leave the ear canal and thus, contributing to excessive earwax buildup.” (http://info.earwaxmd.com/blog/5-things-to-know-about-earwax-and-cold-weather)

The best way to prevent something like that happening to you is regular checkups with a hearing care professional to make sure neither phenomenon is happening for you.

Earwax isn’t an appetizing topic, but it’s an important function of the ear, and it’s one that people tend to worry about.

To find out if you need hearing aids, we can do an assessment and help you build a strategy that works best for you.

We can’t wait to help you gain a better hearing lifestyle. Here at Smithtown Hearing Services we are committed to better hearing and committed to you! Contact Smithtown Sayville Hearing Services at (631) 993-4719 today to set up an appointment.

Posted by Admin

Do Men and Women “Hear” Differently?

It’s been a long-standing joke for years…women just assume men aren’t listening. But studies prove that’s not necessarily the case. They just hear differently.

Research conducted at the Indiana University School of Medicine may help resolve an age-old dilemma between the sexes. Men listen with only one side of their brains, while women use both.

So, technically speaking, the answer is yes. They DO hear differently.

 

This was proven when twenty men and twenty women had MRI’s done while listening to an excerpt from a John Grisham novel. The imaging showed that the left hemisphere of the brain was alight for the men, but for the women, both hemispheres lit up.

“A majority of the men showed exclusive activity on the left side of the brain, in the temporal lobe, which is classically associated with listening and speech. The majority of women showed activity in the temporal lobe on both sides of the brain, although predominantly on the left. The right side of the brain traditionally is associated with performing music and understanding spatial relationships, rather than listening.”

Another interesting study demonstrated men’s reactions versus women’s reactions to a crying infant.

They were asked to empty their minds while listening to a white noise machine, with sounds of a crying infant interspersed throughout while an MRI mapped their responses.

“The researchers found that when participants listened to the typical infant cries, the brain activity of men and women differed. When hearing a hungry infant cry, women’s brains were more likely to disengage from the default mode, indicating that they focused their attention on the crying. In contrast, the men’s brains tended to remain in default mode during the infant crying sounds. The brain patterns did not vary between parents and nonparents.”

Isn’t that interesting? All those times you thought your spouse was just ignoring the baby – they in fact might not have even registered the sound!

The studies are not conclusive – because it’s not known whether this is a nature vs nurture situation. Do women listen differently because they are raised to? Or are they just born that way?

No one is really sure. But you can be sure that studies will continue.

There are still instances of both men AND women needing hearing aids because their hearing deficiencies are damage related.

To find out if you need hearing aids, we can do an assessment and help you build a strategy that works best for you.

We can’t wait to help you gain a better hearing lifestyle. Here at Smithtown Hearing Services we are committed to better hearing and committed to you! Contact Smithtown Sayville Hearing Services at (631) 993-4719 today to set up an appointment.

Posted by Admin

Should You Disclose Your Hearing Loss During a Job Interview?

Job interviews can really be stressful. You want to make the right impression. You want to put your best foot forward. And you surely don’t want to give them any reason to pick someone else over you.

If you suffer from hearing loss, this leaves you with the conundrum… to tell, or not to tell?

If you wear very obvious hearing aids, they of course, will be able to tell right away. But if your devices are more discreet, they may not even notice.

So disclose, or not?

Well, really, that’s your call.

By law, you cannot be discriminated against because of your hearing loss. If you tell the interviewer and you can prove that they did not hire you simply because of your hearing loss, they can get into very big trouble.

In fact, they can’t even ask if you have a hearing impairment without getting in trouble.

It has to be solely at your discretion whether to disclose or not.

Some people choose not to let their potential employer know because they don’t want to hurt their chances (regardless of the law, they still think it might), or because they want to prove that they can get the job on their own.

We totally get that. Independence and autonomy are important to a lot of people.

Additionally, we want you to be aware that all employers are required to offer “reasonable accommodations” to anyone protected by the ADA.

“A reasonable accommodation is any change or adjustment to a job, the work environment, or the way things usually are done that would allow you to apply for a job, perform job functions, or enjoy equal access to benefits available to other individuals in the workplace. There are many types of things that may help people with disabilities work successfully. Some of the most common types of accommodations include:

  • physical changes, such as installing a ramp or modifying a workspace or restroom;
  • sign language interpreters for people who are deaf or readers for people who are blind;
  • providing a quieter workspace or making other changes to reduce noisy distractions for someone with a mental disability;
  • training and other written materials in an accessible format, such as in Braille, on audio tape, or on computer disk;
  • TTYs for use with telephones by people who are deaf, and hardware and software that make computers accessible to people with vision impairments or who have difficulty using their hands; and
  • time off for someone who needs treatment for a disability.”

(https://www.ada.gov/workta.htm)

The bottom line is, no one can make this decision but you.

But please keep in mind that it is unlawful for a potential employer to discriminate against you due to hearing loss.

If you aren’t sure how to handle it, stop in and chat with us.

We can do an assessment and help you build a strategy that works best for you.

We can’t wait to help you gain a better hearing lifestyle. Here at Smithtown Hearing Services we are committed to better hearing and committed to you! Contact us today to schedule a FREE assessment.

Posted by Admin

Recharge Your Hearing!

Extraordinary sound quality meets ZPower™ rechargeable convenience

Read more
+See terms for details

Schedule an appointment

Free hearing assessment

Request Appointment

Convenient, monthly payments to fit your budget*

Do you have concerns about your hearing? We have options for financing.

Learn more

Live life without limits

You deserve solutions tailored to your lifestyle. Whether you are an athlete or a bookworm – you can achieve optimal hearing.

Get started